Performance Review: Long-term Updates

Prose: Jake Sittler (@jtsittler)

We’ve got performance reviews for seven different models already in our archives, with yours truly responsible for four of them. The Nike Hyperdunk Low 2012, Jordan CP3.VI, adidas Crazyquick and Nike KD V Elite are the four models I’ve had the pleasure of hooping in. While you can hit any of the links and read the full review, I wanted to give you guys a quick update on how each of the shoes progressed in terms of performance over time.

Nike Hyperdunk Low 2012
Review posted: 1/29/13

hyperdunkreview11

The Hyperdunk Low really impressed me in terms of fit and lockdown, with the Dynamic Flywire doing a better than expected job in both departments. Fit is an important aspect of the performance of any pair of shoes, but is especially crucial in a low-top basketball shoe because so little material is used for lockdown. The Hyperdunk Low did not disappoint and I continued to feel secure and strapped in when it came to the fit, no matter how many games I put it through.

However, after 5-6 weeks of playing in them, I really noticed the Lunarlon cushioning go flat. I felt that the foam used simply compacted and lost a lot of responsiveness. I know plenty in the sneaker community are fans of Lunar foam, and I’ll admit that the cushioning setup does form to your foot – thus improving the fit even more. I simply don’t think it holds up as long as it should, especially given the price of the shoe. It got bad enough on my knees that I eventually switched over to the CP3.VI full-time, as its Podulon cushioning setup was one of my favorites so far.

Jordan CP3.VI
Review posted: 3/15/13

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The CP3.VI was really close to being an elite performance shoe – and it was still really, really good. The Podulon cushioning, as mentioned before, was awesome. The targeted zones were well-placed and allowed for excellent responsiveness and transition through the footstrike. Traction was top-notch too, with a deep herringbone pattern featuring flex grooves at precisely the right points. The traction remains some of the best I’ve had on a performance hoops shoe.

The only complaint I had with the shoe had to do with the fit, especially near the heel. The achilles pad, so often used in the CP3 line, really hindered the lockdown at the heel. It was just impossible to get total lockdown with the pad in the way. It’s great for comfort; not so great for lockdown. I also felt that the Fuse upper – while proving to be extremely durable – didn’t give me a perfect either simply because the material was too thick or stiff to fully conform to my foot.

adidas adipure Crazyquick
Review posted: 5/13/13

crazyquick03

The Crazyquick is easily my favorite shoe of the bunch and one of my all-time favorites in terms of performance (alongside the Kobe VI, Zoom BB2 and Zoom Drive). I’m currently playing in it for all competitive games and have been switching it out with the KD V Elite for workouts. The fit is simply fantastic. It’s snug and locks you into the midsole from heel to toe thanks to the Techfit upper and Sprintframe chassis. There’s been a lengthy debate concerning the cushioning and whether it’s plush enough, but to me it allows the shoe to function perfectly. The Crazyquick plays low to the ground with excellent court feel – thus giving up some impact protection – but the shoe’s responsiveness and lateral stability are unrivaled.

Nike KD V Elite
Review posted: 6/11/13

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While it’s not as “long-term” of an update, here’s a few final thoughts on the most recently tested model, the KD V Elite. The KD V Elite was a shoe that I was eager to test out, but simply didn’t meet the expectations set up by the Elite title, high-end materials and price point. The technology isn’t in question – it’s riddled with high-performance parts. Caged Zoom Air, carbon fiber shank and heel counter, and a Flywire-based upper are more than enough when it comes to tech. It’s just those pieces don’t function as well as they should.

The Zoom cushioning is hampered by poor, slappy transition that saps its responsiveness. The chassis was simply too stiff to allow for smooth heel-toe transition for those of us that are heel-strikers. The fit was extremely snug and lockdown was tight, but there wasn’t a comfort level that I was used to in the CP3.VI or Crazyquick. I loved the low cut and the fit, but the shoe simply felt too stripped down for its high-performance elements.

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2 responses to “Performance Review: Long-term Updates

  1. The Crazyquick is my favorite too. Adidas did their thing last year on all facets of sport shoes in 2012 โ€“ 2013. Canโ€™t wait to try Adidas 2014 models, just hope they come out with some conservative colors. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • I agree. I didn’t think the Ghost was as nice as the Crazyquick and I didn’t love the Crazy Light, but overall the brand did well-can’t wait to try Boost cushioning in the Rose 5. The CQ probably only works for a certain segment of players, but as a guard shoe it’s damn near perfect

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